Difference between revisions of "AAMToolbox simplify point model"

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[[File:Loading_point_model_walk_AAMToolbox.png|700px|Loading a point model into ModelViewer]]<br>
 
[[File:Loading_point_model_walk_AAMToolbox.png|700px|Loading a point model into ModelViewer]]<br>
In the act of loading an image file (highlighted in sub-window). The buttons needed to load an image - actually the point model associated with an image - calculate the associated weights and resetting the model again.<br><br>
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In the act of loading an image file (highlighted in sub-window). Red ellipses highlight the buttons needed to load an image - actually the point model associated with an image - calculate the associated weights and reset the model back to the mean again.<br><br>
 
[[File:Deviations_of_a_particular_point_model_AAMToolbox.png|700px|Point model in ModelViewer]]<br>
 
[[File:Deviations_of_a_particular_point_model_AAMToolbox.png|700px|Point model in ModelViewer]]<br>
Result of Calculating the Weights (see button) . Notice that <br><br>
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Result of Calculating the Weights (see button) . Notice that the bars representing the principle components have been adjusted to show how far this approximation to the point model deviates from the mean.<br><br>

Revision as of 20:32, 20 February 2012

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What does it mean to best fit the shape model to a particular image point model

All the point models were used to find the shape model. If there were just two dimensions, this would be similar to fitting a straight line to y=ax by finding a. In the Cartoons shape model, there are 34*2=68 dimensions yielding 68 components. However, most of these represent noise and the Stats Model Generator found that 95% of the variance could be accounted for by just 5 of the components. So we should (actually, might is a better word) be able to represent any of the point models that we used to build the shape model. Here, we project a particular point model into shape space, take the 5 principle components (setting the rest to zero), and project the result back into our normal viewing space. The result should look similar to the point model itself.

Loading a point model into ModelViewer
In the act of loading an image file (highlighted in sub-window). Red ellipses highlight the buttons needed to load an image - actually the point model associated with an image - calculate the associated weights and reset the model back to the mean again.

Point model in ModelViewer
Result of Calculating the Weights (see button) . Notice that the bars representing the principle components have been adjusted to show how far this approximation to the point model deviates from the mean.